Chamomile: A Herbal Medicine of the Past with Bright Future

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A 2010 review from the National Institutes of Health examining the various preparations uses for Blue Chamomile. The authors affirm the anti-inflammatory impact of its flavonoids and essential oils on skin when applied topically.

We use Roman Chamomile - the strongest form of Blue Chamomile - in our Moisturizing Blue Oil.

Chamomile is one of the oldest, most widely used and well documented medicinal plants in the world and has been recommended for a variety of healing applications. Chamomile is a native of the old World and is a member of the daisy family (Asteraceae or Compositae)

The flowers of chamomile contain 1–2% volatile oils including alpha-bisabolol, alphabisabolol oxides A & B, and matricin (usually converted to chamazulene and other flavonoids which possess anti-inflammatory and antiphlogistic properties. A study in human volunteers demonstrated that chamomile flavonoids and essential oils penetrate below the skin surface into the deeper skin layers. This is important for their use as topical antiphlogistic (anti-inflammatory) agents.


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